KEYNOTES

Interested in learning more about who will be at OGDcamp 2011? Here are snapshots of some of the camp’s featured speakers.

Carl-Christian Buhr

Carl-Christian Buhr, an economist and computer scientist by training, is a member of the cabinet of Digital Agenda Commissioner and EU Commission Vice-President Neelie Kroes. Among others, he advises her on ICT research policy, including Open Access policies, ICT standardisation and interoperability. In his previous job in the Commission, he dealt with antitrust and merger control investigations such as the Microsoft antitrust case and the Oracle/Sun Microsystems merger.

Regarding his keynote, Buhr writes, “In an introductory video message to the OGDCamp EU Digital Agenda Commissioner, Neelie Kroes will give a glimpse of her upcoming policy proposals for Open Data. Building on that, my talk will expand on the link between public sector information and scientific information, as well as the way these are treated by EU policies. In particular, for data as opposed to documents, more convergence between these two fields is expected.”

David Eaves

David Eaves is an open government advocate and expert who has successfully lobbied several governments to adopt open data strategies. A native of Vancouver, Canada, he co-drafted the City of Vancouver’s open data motion, and has advised at the local, regional and national level on open data and open government strategies. He is frequently asked to speak on lessons and ideas around open data with fellow advocates, policy makers, politicians and the public.

Regarding his keynote, Eaves writes, “It’s been an exciting year in the world Open Data – the launch of the Open Government Partnership and the arrival of open data to Africa are two powerful examples of continued political engagement and success. But it remains early days and there is still much work to do. In my keynote I will outline some of the emerging opportunities and challenges as well as suggest goals and strategies for the movement’s next steps.”

Ellen S. Miller

Ellen S. Miller is the co-founder and executive director of the Sunlight Foundation, a Washington-based, non-partisan non-profit dedicated to using the power of the Internet to catalyze greater government openness and transparency. She is the founder of two other prominent Washington-based organizations in the field of money and politics — the Center for Responsive Politics and Public Campaign — and a nationally recognized expert on transparency and the influence of money in politics. Her experience as a Washington advocate for more than 35 years spans the worlds of non-profit advocacy, grassroots activism and journalism.

Regarding her keynote, Ellen writes, “I will showcase some of my organization’s efforts that are designed to create accountability in government, using the web to make influence and government activity more transparent. The presentation will also cover the open data movement generally, and the growing international movement for government transparency.”

Andrew Rasiej

Andrew Rasiej is a serial social entrepreneur and founder of the Personal Democracy Forum, an annual conference and website about the intersection of technology, politics, government and advocacy. He is the co-founder of TechPresident.com, an award-winning blog that covers how the White House, the federal government, and Congress are using the web and how technology is empowering new levels of citizen engagement throughout the United States. He is also the founder of MOUSE.org, co-founder of Mideastwire.com, and a Senior Technology Advisor to the Sunlight Foundation as well as chairman of the NY Tech Meetup.

Regarding his keynote, Rasiej writes, “E-government has always been known as government agencies using technology people use every day to deliver the services we expect them to deliver. But now, as governments make more public data available and citizens are beginning to collect data themselves, a new era is emerging called We-Government, where citizens are building tools, applications, and platforms, that are useful to people in their civic lives. This new hybrid partnership between government and citizens has the potential to redefine civic engagement and re-envigorate democracy through civic participation that goes beyond voting while creating more efficiency, transparency, and accountability of government.”

Nigel Shadbolt

Nigel Shadbolt was appointed an Information Advisor in June 2009 by the Prime Minister to help transform public access to Government Information. A major output of this work has been the widely acclaimed data.gov.uk site. In May 2010, he was appointed by the UK Coalition Government to the Public Sector Transparency Board which advises on Open Data across the public sector. He also Chairs the Local Data Panel seeking to promote and develop open data approaches within Local Government and was recently asked to Chair the UK midata programme – which seeks to empower consumers by releasing their data back to them.

Regarding his keynote, Shadbolt writes, “This talk will review our successes in Open Government Data and why it is so important to us all. It will include a frank discussion of the problems encountered and the challenges that lay ahead. Problems and challenges that will be much more tractable if we work together. It will also detail some key requirements around policy and technology to ensure the efforts can scale and complement each other.”

Tom Steinberg

Tom Steinberg is the founder and director of mySociety, a non-profit, open source organisation that runs many of the best-known democracy websites in the UK. These include the Parliamentary transparency website TheyWorkForYou, Freedom of Information hub WhatDoTheyKnow, and the self-explanatory FixMyStreet. Tom is currently spending most of his time trying to put mySociety onto a self-sustaining basis through development of commercial services, helping people outside the UK benefit from mySociety’s work, and showing how much he values mySociety’s unparalleled team of staff and volunteers.

Regarding his keynote, Steinberg writes, “I will be making a case for a radical overhaul of the way the EU tries and fails to support digital innovation for social and democratic purposes.”

Andrew Stott

Andrew Stott was Director for Transparency and Digital Engagement for the UK Government leading the work to open up government data, create “data.gov.uk” and implement the new Government’s commitments on Transparency of central and local government.  He continues to advise UK Ministers as a member of the UK Public Sector Transparency Board, as well as advising other governments and contributing to the international development of the Open Data agenda.

Regarding his keynote, Stott writes, “For first movers the early battles have been fought, and won. A key challenge now is how to make Open Data ‘business as usual’. Drawing on my experience implementing data.gov.uk and other open data initiatives, my talk will look at overcoming the continuing obstacles and excuses to Open Government Data, and how the international open data community need to work together to help do this.”

Chris Taggart

Chris Taggart is the CEO and co-founder of OpenCorporates: The Open Database Of the Corporate World, which has worked with the open data community to build a database of over 25 million companies, all open data. Originally a journalist and later magazine publisher, he now works full time in the field of open data, and is on the UK government’s Local Public Data Panel, and Mayor of London’s Digital Advisory Board.

Regarding his keynote, Taggart writes, “I’ll be speaking about cross-border open government data — what it is, why it’s important, what are the problems, and how do we organize it?”